Chapter 3: Core Strategy

opendate_range28 Sep, 2020, 9:00am - 9 Dec, 2020, 4:00pm

3.1 Core Strategy Vision - County Wexford 2027  

This Plan builds on the Vision for the county which formed part of the 2013-2019 County Development Plan and which is also used in the Wexford Local Economic Community Plan   2016-2021 (LECP). The vision also places climate action at the heart of the future planning of the county. 
 By 2027 County Wexford will:  

  •  Be a self-sustaining, low carbon, climate resilient county where people want to live, work and play.
  • Offer high quality sustainable employment opportunities and high quality residential developments. 
  • Have sustainable urban and rural environments supported by excellent physical and social infrastructure.
  • Continue to value its unique natural environment, built and cultural heritage, and which offers a range of high quality experiences to both residents and visitors. 

3.2 Compliance with the Planning and Development Act 2000 (as amended)

The Planning and Development Act, 2000 (as amended) introduced a requirement to include a Core Strategy in a development plan. It acts as the fundamental link between national, regional, county and local planning by demonstrating that the local planning policy is consistent with higher level national and regional policy and objectives and it informs local plans such as Local Area Plans and the LECP. 

The Core Strategy is required to set out a medium to long term strategy which is evidenced based and it specifies the location and quantum of residential zoned land in the county. The Strategy also provides the context for planning and prioritising investments in infrastructure including water services, public transport, education and healthcare. 

In accordance with the requirements of the Act, the Core Strategy demonstrates compliance with the objectives of the National Planning Framework (NPF) and the Regional Spatial and Economic Strategy (RSES) in Section 3.3. The Settlement Hierarchy and population targets of the NPF and its associated Roadmap and the RSES have been used to inform the settlement hierarchy and Core Strategy population allocations (Section 3.7) in this Plan. Table 3.4  contains the required information on area of land etc.

The Core Strategy has been formulated having regard to the 10 NSOs in the NPF, the 11 key strategy elements of the RSES and the Section 28 Guidelines and other policies of the Ministers of the Government as required. Having regard to the rural nature and rural population of County Wexford the Core Strategy and the guiding principles for the Development Strategy has also been informed by ‘Realising our Rural Potential: Action Plan for Rural Development 2017’ (Department of Rural and Community Development. 

The Settlement Hierarchy (Section 3.5) details the key locations or types of locations where development will take place. Detail of compliance with the Rural Housing Guidelines is provided in Section 3.9 of this chapter and in Chapter 4 Sustainable Housing. The Plan must also comply with Special Planning Policies Requirement (SPPR) set out in relevant Section 28 guidelines. These SPPR currently relate to Apartment developments and Building Heights and are addressed in Chapter 4 Sustainable Housing, Chapter 5 Towns and Villages and Volume 2 Development Management Manual.

The Core Strategy is aligned  with and supported by the Housing Strategy (Chapter 4 and Volume 9), the Economic Development Strategy (Chapter 6), the Transportation Strategy (Chapter 8) and the Retail Strategy (Volume 8). The Core Strategy is also illustrated on a diagrammatic map  (Figure 3-1) which identifies the main settlements, existing road and rail routes and designated rural areas in the county. 

3.3 Compliance with the NPF and the RSES

3.3.1 National Planning Framework

The NPF places a strong emphasis on strengthening Ireland’s urban structure by targeting both population and employment growth in these areas, promoting urban infill and brownfield development and ensuring that urban areas are attractive, liveable, well designed, high quality places that are home to diverse and integrated communities that enjoy a high quality of life and well-being.  

The NPF acknowledges the importance of rural towns and villages in terms of their economic, administrative and social functions. It seeks to activate the potential for renewal and strengthen and diversify rural towns as a focus for local housing and employment growth and regeneration. In the NPF ‘rural’ is considered to include towns and villages up to a population of 10,000 people. Accordingly, 72% of the population of Wexford is considered rural. 

With regard to the housing in the open countryside, the NPF recognises that there is a continuing need for housing provision for people who live and work in rural areas. However, it outlines that there is a need to carefully manage this demand, particular in the most accessible countryside around cities and towns. In this regard, the NPF confirms that in rural areas under urban influence the core consideration must be a demonstrable economic  or social need to live in that rural area . 

Table 3-1 shows how the 10 NSOs have been integrated into the Plan. A number of NPOs have also informed the Core Strategy, the Development Strategy and population allocations including NPO 2c, NPO 3c, NPO 4, NPO 5 NPO 6, NPO 7, NPO 9, NPO 10b and NPO11. 

3.3.2 Regional Spatial and Economic Strategy for the Southern Region

Table 3-1 also shows how the 11 key strategy elements of the RSES have been incorporated into the Plan. The formulation of the settlement typologies and the Settlement Hierarchy in this chapter had regard to the tailored approach and the guiding principles contained in Section 3.3 of the RSES. The hierarchy follows a similar hierarchy to the RSES (Section 3.5 Key Towns, Section 3.6 Towns and Villages and Section 3.7 Rural Areas). There is also focus on connecting settlements and exploring potential networks (Section 3.8 Networks). RPO 30 Eastern Economic Corridor is recognised as a priority for the county and region and is embedded in the settlement development strategy. 

Table 3-1 Integration of the NPF and RSES into the Wexford County Development Plan 2021-2027

NPF NSO

RSES Strategy

RSES Strategy

Incorporation into CDP

  1.  

Compact Growth

Strengthening and growing our cities and metropolitan areas building on the strong network of Towns throughout the region and supporting our villages and rural areas.

2 - Climate Action

3 - Core Strategy and Settlement

4 - Sustainable Housing

5 - Town and Villages

6 - Economic Development

8 – Transportation

Volume 3 Settlements

 

  1.  

Enhanced Regional Accessibility

Enhancing regional accessibility through upgraded transport infrastructure and digital connectivity allied to transformed settlement hierarchy.

3 - Core Strategy and Settlement

8 - Transportation

9 – Infrastructure

  1.  

Strengthened Rural Economies and Communities

Strengthening the role of and improving quality of life in the region’s diverse rural areas and communities and valuing our rural region as dynamic, resilient and outward looking.

3 - Core Strategy and Settlement

4 - Sustainable Housing

5 - Towns and Villages

6 - Economic Development

7 - Tourism

8 - Transportation

9 -  Infrastructure

12 - Coastal Zone Management

Volume 3 Settlements

Volume 9 Housing Strategy

  1.  

Sustainable mobility

Transforming our transport systems towards well-functioning sustainable integrated public transport, walking and cycling and electric vehicles.

2 - Climate Action

3 - Core Strategy and Settlement

4 -  Sustainable Housing

5 - Towns and Villages

8 - Transportation

15 - Recreation and Open Space Strategy

  1.  

A strong economy, supported by enterprise, innovation and skills

Building a competitive, innovative and productive economy.

6 -  Economic Development

7 – Tourism

12 – Coastal Zone

15 – Sustainable Communities and Social Infrastructure

Volume 8 Retail Strategy

  1.  

High-Quality International Connectivity

Optimising our international connectivity through investment and increased capacity in our ports and airports and provision of high-quality digital connectivity throughout the region.

6 - Economic Development

7 - Tourism Development

8 - Transportation Strategy

9 - Infrastructure

12 - Coastal Zone Management

15 -  Sustainable Communities and Social Infrastructure

Volume 3 – Settlement Plan for Rosslare Harbour

  1.  

Enhanced culture, amenity and heritage

 

Strengthening and protecting region’s diversity, language and culture, our recreational assets and our natural and built heritage.

5 -  Towns and Villages

10 -  Environmental Management

13 - Heritage and Conservation Strategy

12 – Landscape and Green Infrastructure

15 - Recreation and Open Space Strategy

Volume 7 Landscape Character Assessment

Volume 12 Strategic Environmental Assessment

Volume 13 Natura Impact Report

  1.  

Transition to a low carbon and climate resilient society

Safeguarding and enhancing our environment through sustainable development prioritising action on climate change across the region, driving the transition to a low carbon and climate resilient society.

Addressed in all chapters in the Plan.

Volume 12 Strategic Environmental Assessment

  1.  

Sustainable management of water, waste and other environmental resources

Providing infrastructure and services in a plan-led manner to ensure the sustainable management of water waste and other environmental resources.

2 - Climate Action

3 - Core Strategy and Settlement Strategy

6 - Economic Development

9 - Infrastructure

10 - Environmental Management

Volume 12 Strategic Environmental Assessment

Volume 13 Natura Impact Report

  1.  

Access to quality childcare, education and health services

Achieving improved education, health and public services and facilities for all citizens and communities.

3 -  Core Strategy and Settlement Strategy

15 - Sustainable Communities and Social Infrastructure

 

 

Building an inclusive outward looking international region on the global stage.

3 - Core Strategy

6 - Economic Development Strategy

15 - Sustainable Communities and Community Infrastructure Strategy

3.4 Core Strategy Guiding Principles 

The Core Strategy for the county was developed around the following guiding principles:

A.Climate Action

The Core Strategy Development Approach is focused on developing and strengthening the role of our towns and villages. There is a focus on increasing residential densities and employment in the main towns, creating ‘live-work towns’, thereby decreasing the distance that people have to travel from their home to work.  The strategy is also focused around settlements with good public transport links, and improving public transport links in other settlements, highlighting the importance of integrating land and transportation to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and facilitate the transition to a low carbon economy. 

B.The development of ‘Centres of Scale’ to drive regional growth

NPO 5 outlines the need to develop cities and towns of sufficient scale and quality to compete internationally and to be drivers of national and regional growth, investment and prosperity. The strategy focuses on the development of the Key towns of Wexford and Gorey in order to build centres of scale capable of being regional economic drivers that will also bring opportunities and advantages to our county. The delivery of these centres will require significant population growth, compact growth and creative place making. It will also require the securing of investment in high class infrastructure including transport, digital connectivity and in developing skills and talent to support economic and enterprise growth.  

C. The development of the Eastern Economic Corridor

NPO 2c focuses on improving accessibility between cities and larger regionally distributed centres. The development of the Eastern Economic Corridor is supported by RPO 42 in the RSES, and this will be both a transport and an economic corridor. It is recognised in Chapter 4 of the RSES as one of the Key Economic Drivers of the Region. It will make County Wexford a pivotal point, connecting the Southern Region to the Dublin – Belfast corridor and west to the Atlantic Economic Corridor. It will also be important post Brexit. The corridor will facilitate and offer many economic development opportunities to towns along the corridor including Gorey, Enniscorthy and Wexford while also supporting the economic development of Rosslare Harbour and the Europort. It also offers opportunities to New Ross Town which provides the link from the corridor to the Southern region and the Atlantic Economic Corridor. It will promote the development of all transport modes on this route including public transport connectivity and optimising the potential for rail freight.  

D. Utilise the proximity to the Waterford MASP

The proximity to Waterford City offers many opportunities for our county, in particular, the west of the county, New Ross Town and Wexford Town and villages such as Ballyhack, Arthurstown and surrounding villages given the ferry connection to Waterford. The improved transport links, via the recently open N25 New Ross By-pass will increase access to job opportunities and access to services including education and health care.  

E. Compact growth and liveable sustainable settlements

Compact growth now lies at the heart of national spatial planning, and is reflected in NSO 1 in the NPF. This approach, which will deliver a greater proportion of our residential development within the existing built up footprints of settlements (at least 30% of new housing) and higher densities, will secure a more sustainable future for our settlements and for our communities. It will help all of our settlements to enhance their attractiveness, viability and vibrancy, in particular our smaller towns, villages and rural areas, while at the same time encouraging economic development and job creation and improving liveability. 

F. Regeneration

The Core Strategy Development Approach supports the NPF focus on the regeneration and rejuvenation of towns and villages of all types. Many of the county’s towns and villages need and will benefit from targeted regeneration, reversing patterns of stagnation or decline, particular in our smaller towns and villages. This approach will improve visual amenities, design quality and place making and will facilitate increased residential population and employment activity, making attractive places to live, work and visit. There are opportunities to leverage funding for regeneration projects under the Rural and Urban Regeneration and Development Funds. 

G. Addressing legacies in places where services have not kept pace with rapid phases of growth) and regional disparities in disadvantage

NPO7 applies a tailored approach to urban development, with a focus on addressing the legacy of rapid unplanned growth, by facilitating amenities and services catch up, jobs growth in recently expanded commuter settlements of all sizes. There are settlements that require a focus on employment generation and investment in infrastructure and services to help address similar legacies. Some settlements require investment and development to address disparities in advantage including unemployment and deprivation. The inclusion of these settlements in the hierarchy allows for a plan-led approach, and an avenue to target investment in areas such as employment, education, services and amenities, and to leverage funding from various sources including under the Rural and Urban Regeneration and Development Funds and the Town and Village Renewal Scheme.

H. Connected settlements and networks

The development approach  supports existing and planned investments in transport including the national and regional road network and railway network by focusing new population and employment development in key settlements which successfully contribute to the integration of land uses and high quality public transport provision and investment in existing and planned transport infrastructure. The framework also focused on maximising opportunities offered by networks of settlements both internally within the county and inter-county networks. 

I. Smart Growth of Settlements

The focus on compact growth and regeneration requires smart growth in our urban areas, which will enable enhanced and effective provision of a range of accessible services for our urban and rural communities, including education, health services and childcare. This approach also focuses on the role of digital connectivity in improving access to range of services including public administration, transport services, education and health and improving quality of life for our residents including our ageing population and people with disabilities.  

J.Vibrant Rural Areas

In line with the Rural Action Plan, the Core Strategy Development Approach has a strong focus on supporting sustainable and vibrant rural communities, supporting and regenerating villages that are struggling or in decline in particular village have lost services in recent years, supporting enterprise and employment and improving rural infrastructure and connectivity as a means of sustaining rural populations and improving quality of life in rural areas. 

Figure 3-1 Core Strategy Map

Core Strategy Map of Wexford

3.5 Core Strategy Settlement Hierarchy

The Settlement Hierarchy is developed around 7 levels. While each level serves a different strategic role, together they will achieve a balanced, spatial planning settlement framework which supports our urban and rural areas. All settlements, regardless of their level, have an important role and contribution to make to the economic and social life of the county. 

It is also important to note the placement of a settlement in a higher level does not mean a higher allocation of growth, e.g. while Courtown and Riverchapel is included at Level 3, it has been allocated a moderate level growth to reflect the rate and pace of population growth in the past and the need for service provision and infrastructure to catch up. 

The allocation of settlements to the different levels had regard to a range of factors including:

  • The guiding principles outlined in Section 3.4.1. 
  • Designation in the RSES, i.e. Key towns.
  • Scale of existing population and its existing performance.
  • Rate and pace of past development and the extent to which there are outstanding requirements for infrastructure and amenities.
  • Accessibility and potential influence in a regional and sub-regional context. 
  • Environmental and infrastructural capacities and the need for a plan-led approach for investment in key infrastructure, e.g. water services.
  • Scale of employment provision and the economic potential of the settlement, including planned economic projects.
  • Extent of local services and amenity provision, in particular, third level education, post primary education, health, retail and leisure.
  • Scope of the settlement to leverage investment, in particular employment.  
  • Character of the local geography and accessibility as a service centre for rural hinterlands.
  • The need to sustain rural populations and services.
  • The need to provide for attractive, alternative options to rural housing within small towns, villages and rural nodes. 
Table No. 3-2 County Wexford Settlement Hierarchy

Settlement Hierarchy

Settlement 1

Level 1 Key Towns

Wexford Town and Gorey Town

Level 2 Large Towns

Enniscorthy Town and New Ross Town

Level 3 Service Settlements

Bridgetown, Bunclody Town, Campile, Castlebridge, Clonroche, Coolgreany, Courtown and Riverchapel, Ferns, Kilmuckridge, Kilmore Quay, Rosslare Harbour and Kilrane, Rosslare Strand, Taghmon and Wellingtonbridge.

Level 4 Large Villages

Adamstown, Ballaghkeen, Ballycanew, Ballycullane, Ballindaggin,  Ballyhogue, Ballymurn, Ballywilliam, Barntown, Blackwater, Bree, Camolin, Carrig-on- Bannow, Clongeen, Craanford, Duncannon, Fethard, Killinerin, Murntown, Oilgate, Oulart, Piercestown, Ramsgrange, Tagoat.

Level 5 Small Villages Category 1

Arthurstown, Caim, Davidstown, Duncormick, Glenbrien, Glynn, Kilmore, Kilmyshall, Kiltealy, Lady's Island, Marshalstown, Monagear, Newbawn, Rathnure and Screen.

Level 5 Small Villages Category 2

Ballinaboola, Ballygarrett, Ballyhack, Ballymitty, Ballymoney, Boolavogue, Castledockrell, Cleriestown, Crossabeg, Curracloe, Duncormick, Foulkesmills, Gusserane, Holyfort, Monamolin, Monaseed, Rathangan, Tomhaggard.

Level 6 Rural Nodes

Ballycarney, Ballycogley, Ballyduff, Ballyedmond, Ballyellis, Ballyfad, Ballyoughter, Ballyroebuck, Baldwinstown, Cahore, Cassagh, Castletown, Cleariestown, Clologue, Clohamon, Cullenstown, Cushinstown, Donard, Galbally, Horeswood, Killann, Killenagh, Killurin, Poulpeasty, Raheen, Rathgarogue, Saltmills, Tara Hill, Tellarought, Tempeshambo, The Harrow, The Rock, Tombrack, Watchhouse Village.

Level 7 Open Countryside

The open countryside outside of the settlements listed in Levels 1 to 6.

3.6 Core Strategy Development Approach

Section 3.6.1 to Section 3.6.7 sets out the development approach for settlements at each level in the Settlement Hierarchy. They are supported by a set of objectives at the end of this chapter. These objectives should also be read in conjunction with the all of the other chapters in the Written Statement and other relevant Volumes of the Plan.  The development approach set out for Wexford Town, Enniscorthy Town and New Ross Town will be incorporated into, and expanded upon, in the new local area plans for those towns. 

3.6.1 Level 1 Key Towns 

Wexford Town

Wexford Town is designated as a Key Town in the RSES. The RSES outlines that, together with 5 other towns of significant size in the Southern Region, Wexford Town is a self-sustaining regional driver which has a comparable structure to the 5 centres designated in the NPF.

Wexford Town is the largest town in the county with a population of 20,188 in 2016. The town has been to the forefront of the county’s Settlement Strategy since 2002 given its designation as a then ‘Hub’ in both the National Spatial Strategy and the Regional Planning Guidelines.  There has been significant targeted investment in the town to support this role and to help achieve the critical mass to function and fulfil its designation as a Hub.  This investment included developing the town’s transport links, water services, educational facilities, in particular third level education, health services, public administration and the development of high quality business locations and supporting service. Given the extent of existing and planned investment, the town will continue to be the county’s primary settlement for residential and economic growth.  

Wexford Town is a significant regional centre for education, health, public services and retail. The town is also a major employment centre for the finance, life sciences and technology sectors. The planned Trinity Wharf mixed use development will provide the platform to significantly enhance the town’s profile as an attractive environment for international companies seeking to locate in the county, or for existing companies looking to expand.

The RSES recognises its role in extending the Eastern Economic Corridor to the Europort and the strategic location of the town in relation to Rosslare Europort. It emphasises the need to ensure that the development of the town supports that relationship with the port.  

Tourism also offers potential to add to the regional economic driver role. The Council’s Tourism Development Strategy proposes to develop Wexford town’s profile as a unique and vibrant Maritime town. This will be centred on the town’s Viking heritage, its long and rich seafaring history, unique maritime environment, water sports, festival and food offering and, in time, the Trinity Wharf Development which includes a marina.

There are also public realm projects which will enhance the attractiveness of the town including the Crescent Quay Enhancement work and the public realm elements of the Trinity Wharf scheme which will develop a new urban quarter with high quality public realm, civic spaces, a new boardwalk and an urban greenway. 
The development of the town is dependent on some infrastructural requirements including road, rail and water services. There is also currently a shortfall in primary and post primary educational places which needs to be urgently addressed in order to accommodate the existing population and future populations and to ensure the town is attractive to families who are relocating to the town for work or other reasons.

Development Approach

In order to fulfil its designation as a Key Town in the RSES and in line with RP0 11 and RPO16, the Council will:     

  1. Allocate significant population growth to the town to contribute to the development of a centre of scale.
  2. Focus on significantly increasing employment and economic development in the town to achieve a critical mass of employers. While the Council will facilitate all types of economic development, there will be a targeted focus on the expanding the town’s profile in the finance, life sciences, technology and tourism sectors and to develop synergies with Wexford Campus of IT and the future TUSE to match skills and talent with the needs of those sectors. 
  3. Focus on the development of Trinity Wharf as a Strategic Employment Location. 
  4. Focus on development in the town that supports the function and expansion of Rosslare Europort, including industrial development, commercial and residential development. 
  5. Focus on maximising the economic opportunities offered by the location of the town on the Eastern Economic Corridor. 
  6. Prioritise the development of brownfield and infill sites in the town centre and close to public transport corridors, and ensure the efficient use of those central sites, achieving compact growth and higher residential densities, while also ensuring attractive and high quality living environments.  
  7. Improve the public realm and attractiveness of the town centre as a place to live, work and visit through the development of key urban regeneration projects such as Trinity Wharf and public realm schemes including Crescent Quay and Monck Street.  
  8. Require the future growth of the town to be planned for on a phased basis in consultation with Irish Water to ensure that sufficient water and wastewater capacity is accounted for and that further growth does not contribute to degradation of the water environment and in particular designated sites. 
  9. Prepare a local transport plan that will inform zoning decisions, include retention and expansion of the town bus network and rail services, improvements to cycling and walking infrastructure and rural transport services into the town and secure investment to deliver the plan. 
  10. Deliver and facilitate the delivery of the new infrastructure to support the planned population growth, including education, health services, social, recreation and amenity open spaces and cultural requirements to keep pace with recent and future planned population growth. 
  11. Support learning, education and training initiatives, economic regeneration initiatives and enterprise to address unemployment and deprivation legacies in the town. 
  12. Support the delivery of the infrastructural requirements which would benefit the key town role including improving road infrastructure to improve links from Rosslare and Wexford to include the M11/M25 Oilgate to Rosslare Harbour scheme, the N30 and the N80, upgrading and development of water supply and additional investment in wastewater infrastructure to support the economic development and anticipated growth of the town. 
  13. Protect and enhance amenities, heritage, green infrastructure and biodiversity in the town. 

There is a set of strategic objectives for the town set out in WT01-WT09. The spatial planning framework for the town will be set out in the new Wexford Town and Environs Local Area Plan. 

Gorey Town 

Gorey was designated as a Key Town in the RSES which notes that it is an important and thriving town which is well placed to accommodate additional economic growth and become more self-sustaining.

The third largest town in the county in 2016, Gorey Town performs a variety of functions including housing, employment, education, health care, retail, recreation, tourism and culture.  The town continues to thrive and is a much sought after residential location due to its proximity to Wicklow and South Dublin. This strategic location, which offers immediate access to Dublin via the M11 and rail, has contributed to it becoming a commuter town with many of the town’s residents dependent on jobs outside of the county, However, equally this strategic location, located on the Eastern Economic Corridor and in proximity to Wexford Town and Rosslare Europort, also offers opportunities to attract and accommodate additional economic growth to allow the town to become more self-sustaining. 

The economic and social impact of commuting is a serious concern, and the creation of new employment opportunities, is a priority for the Council in order to reduce the unsustainable levels of commuting. Given its strategic location and the available skills pool, the town is attractive to a variety of sectors including the IT sector, logistics and tourism. The recently developed M11 Business Park, Ballyloughan Business Park and Gorey Business Park all offer property solutions for economic development, along with the quantum of undeveloped lands that are zoned for economic and employment related uses. 

The town is performing very well in terms of retail and services. The town centre is vibrant and attractive, with some opportunities for brownfield and infill developments. The redevelopment of the Market House and associated back lands for a cultural development is one such site. There has also been significant investment in the public realm, with the recent redevelopment of the Avenue and the planned works on Esmonde Street. 
The town is also well served by wastewater services due to recent upgrade of the Courtown wastewater treatment plant. In this regard, the town can accommodate the additional population and employment growth envisaged to achieve its role as a regional economic driver. 

There is however a shortfall in post primary educational places which needs to be urgently addressed. There are sufficient lands zoned in the Gorey LAP to accommodate additional education facilities, and the Council will continue to advocate for the delivery of additional school places as a priority for the existing population and the future population. 

Development Approach

In order to fulfil its designation as a Key Town in the RSES and in line with RPO 11 and RPO 25, the Council authority will:

  1. Allocate significant population growth to the town to contribute to the development of a Centre of Scale.
  2. Focus on significantly increasing employment and economic development in the town to allow the town to become a Strategic Employment Location, be more self-sustaining and to counteract unsustainable commuting out of the county for jobs. While the Council will facilitate all type of economic development, there will be focus a strong focus on the ICT and technology sectors.
  3. Focus on maximising the economic opportunities offered by the location of the town on the Eastern Economic Corridor. 
  4. Prioritise the development of brownfield and infill sites in the town centre and close to public transport corridors, and ensure the efficient use those central sites, achieving compact growth and higher residential densities, while also ensuring attractive and high quality living environments.  
  5. Continue to improve the public realm and attractiveness of the town centre as a place to live, work and visit through the development of key projects including Esmonde Street and the Market House.   
  6. Require the future growth of the town to be planned for on a phased basis in consultation with Irish Water to ensure that sufficient water and wastewater capacity is accounted for and that further growth does not contribute to degradation of the water environment and in particular designated sites. 
  7. Deliver and facilitate the delivery of the social and community infrastructure to support the future population growth including education, health services, recreation and amenity open spaces, social and cultural requirements to keep pace with recent and future planned population growth. 
  8. Prepare a local transport plan that will inform zoning decisions, include the development of the town bus network and rail services, improvements to cycling and walking infrastructure and rural transport services into the town and secure investment to deliver the plan. 
  9. Support the delivery of the infrastructural requirements which would benefit the key town role including investment in the Dublin-Gorey-Rosslare Europort rail to protect the line and increase speed and frequency of services, the planned Gorey Regional Water Supply programme, the orbital route and bridges over the rail line as proposed in the Gorey LAP. 
  10. Protect and enhance amenities, heritage, green infrastructure and biodiversity in the town. 

There is a set of strategic objectives for the town set out in GT01 to GT07.  The spatial planning framework for the town is set out in the Gorey Town and Environs Local Area Plan 2017-2023. 

3.6.2 Level 2 Large Towns

The NPF defines large towns as those with a population of >10,000 in 2016 and Enniscorthy Town falls within this ‘definition’. While New Ross has a smaller population (8,040 in 2016), it does perform the same important functions for its residents and municipal district as Enniscorthy Town does for its municipal district and it is therefore included at the same level. 

Enniscorthy Town
The second largest town in the county, Enniscorthy Town provides a range of functions including housing, employment, education, health care, retail and recreation, tourism and culture.  The town’s development has been curtailed in recent years due to wastewater infrastructural constraints. This issue has been addressed, and along with the opening of the M11 Enniscorthy Bypass in July 2019 and the town’s location on the Eastern Economic Corridor, new opportunities present for the town and it will be in position to accommodate additional growth, both population and employment. 

The development of employment opportunities in the town is a priority for the Council, to help address the legacy of unemployment and deprivation that is associated with some parts of the town. The town is carving out a new and exciting name for itself in the area of high performance buildings (nZEB). In 2017, the town was chosen as the location of one of three global UN ‘Centres of Excellences’ for curbing carbon emissions with a particular emphasis on high performance buildings. The centre, which is anticipated will become the National centre, provides significant opportunities to attract investment in research and development, technology transfer between third level education institutions, enterprise, up skilling and re-skilling. 

The new Enniscorthy Business and Technology Park is located at Killagoley on approximately 14.45 hectares. The development will facilitate Small and Medium Enterprises. The objective is to deliver a modern industrial facility with a view to attracting businesses from the science and technology sectors and the creation of jobs and the betterment of the local economy.

The RSES introduces the concept of Smart Cities and Towns which deploy digital technologies. It recognises that Enniscorthy Town has taken the initial steps towards the achievement of Smart Town Status with the establishment of the FAB LAB in 2017, the development of a Technology Park for smart business and the establishment of the NZEB training centre. 

The Council is committed to developing the town as a tourist destination and is currently developing a Master Plan to develop the town as new iconic visitor attraction and public realm space whilst protecting its strong heritage, cultural and environmental sites. It will be aligned to Ireland’s Ancient East, taking advantage of Vinegar Hill and Enniscorthy Castle which fit within the ‘Conquer and Conquest’ theme. The town can also benefit from clustering with other nearby tourist locations including the National Heritage Park in Wexford Town and Ferns Castle. 

There are also plans to develop blueway from Bunclody through Enniscorthy Town to Wexford Town. 

There are areas in town in need of regeneration. The Council is currently advancing proposals for an ambitious regeneration of the Templeshannon area. It includes a number of key infrastructural projects including the improvement of the public realm and streetscape, improving accessibility and linkages from the area to the rest of the town including a new pedestrian bridge, transformation of the Waterfront Leisure Centre private car park to a create a new civic space and a public car park and improvements of the Enniscorthy Railway Station arrival area and connection to the rest of the town. 

Recent investment in waste water services infrastructure places the town is in a good position to accommodate additional growth, both population and employment. A long awaited flood relief scheme is also due to commence soon. The town would benefit from investment in infrastructure including the rail line and improved road links in particular the N30 and N80.  

Enniscorthy as a Smart Town

  1. Enniscorthy is designated a smart town by the Southern Regional Spatial and Economic Strategy (RSES). Wexford County Council will develop a detailed development strategy based on this designation with a particular focus on developing Enniscorthy as a national leader in digital technology, innovation and transformation with a view to making Enniscorthy well connected, sustainable, resilient and technologically literate. 
  2. The Council will leverage information and communication technologies, the internet of things, geospatial technology (such as geographic information systems, remote sensor technology and geofencing), artificial intelligence, blockchain applications, cloud based applications and wireless technologies, among others, to develop and future proof Enniscorthy. The Council will prioritise Enniscorthy as an early adopter of smart technology. Wexford County Council will leverage technological solutions for Enniscorthy to improve public services, infrastructure, social, economic, tourist, employment and living experiences of Enniscorthy’s residents.     
  3. In developing Enniscorthy as a smart town, Wexford County Council will seek, private, public, and governmental (International, European (including Interreg funding), national and local) investment. It will furthermore seek to develop strategic research and innovation partnerships with suitable European partner towns and cities.
  4.  As a subset of Enniscorthy as a smart town strategy and acknowledging Enniscorthy town’s strategic importance as a UN centre of excellence in energy efficiency in High Performance Buildings, Wexford County Council will specifically pursue a focused Smart Town/Smart Environment strategy which marries the smart town strategy with environmental sustainability aims. The council will look to Reykjavik and Amsterdam, among others, for precedent and inspiration. 
  5. Wexford County Council will develop Bunclody and Ferns as smart hubs under the umbrella of the Enniscorthy Smart Town strategy.

Development Approach

In order to fulfil its designation as a Large Town, the Council will:

  1. Allocate moderate population growth to the town.
  2. Focus on increasing employment and economic development in the town, and maximise the opportunities offered by Enniscorthy Business and Technology Park and the UN Centre of Excellence in High Performance Buildings. 
  3. Focus on maximising the economic opportunities offered by town’s location on the Eastern Economic Corridor. 
  4. Focus on regeneration of the town centre including the Templeshannon area.
  5. Further develop the town’s tourism potential and maximise the direct and indirect spin off for the towns and its residents. 
  6. Support learning, education and training initiatives, economic regeneration initiatives and enterprise to address unemployment and deprivation legacies in the town. 
  7. Prioritise the development of brownfield and infill sites in the town centre and close to public transport nodes, and ensure the efficient use of those central sites, achieving compact growth and higher residential densities, while also ensuring attractive and high quality living environments.  
  8. Continue to improve the public realm and attractiveness of the town centre as a place to live, work and visit through the development of key projects including the regeneration of the Templeshannon Area and the Quays and public realm improvements to the town centre.
  9. Require the future growth of the town to be planned for on a phased basis in consultation with Irish Water to ensure that sufficient water and wastewater capacity is accounted for and that further growth does not contribute to degradation of the water environment and in particular designated sites. 
  10. Support the delivery of the social and community infrastructure to support the additional population including education, health services, recreation and amenity open spaces, social and cultural requirements to keep pace with recent and future planned population growth. 
  11. Prepare a local transport plan that will inform zoning decisions, include the development of the town bus network and rail services, improvements to cycling and walking infrastructure and rural transport services into the town and secure investment to deliver the plan. 
  12. Support the delivery of the infrastructural requirements which would benefit  the town including; investment in the Dublin-Gorey-Rosslare Europort rail to protect the line and increase speed and frequency of services, road links and infrastructure including the N30 and the N80, the Flood Relief Scheme and investments in digital connectivity and technologies. Flood scheme
  13. Protect and enhance amenities, heritage, green infrastructure and biodiversity in all new development. 
  14. With the opening of the Enniscorthy bypass, Enniscorthy is at risk of suffering the same economic and social impact of commuting that towns of a similar distance from Dublin have suffered. The creation of new employment opportunities in Enniscorthy is a priority for the council in order to reduce and prevent the development of unsustainable levels of commuting and to tackle existing levels of social deprivation. To this end the Council will focus on increasing employment and economic development in the town. While the council will facilitate all types of economic development there will be a strong focus on life sciences, funds and other similar financial services sectors and environmental research and development sectors.   
  15. The Council recognises Enniscorthy’s role as a historical market town with a large natural catchment area. In particular, the council recognises the close historical and economic connections of the Level 3 Service Settlements of Bunclody and Ferns with Enniscorthy town. The council will strengthen the economic, tourism and transport connectedness between these urban centres, including the development of strategic cycle routes and improvements to walking infrastructure and rural transport links. 
  16. The Council acknowledges the environmental, tourism and economic importance of the River Slaney and will seek to develop these. The council will also focus on developing a Blueway between Bunclody and Enniscorthy to include adjacent cycleway and walking trail. The council will make a significant effort to abate and reverse the degradation of the river Slaney at Clohamon bridge and its environs. Any such proposals will be subject to Appropriate Assessment in accordance with the requirements of the EU Habitats Directive to ensure the protection and preservation of the Slaney River Valley SAC.
  17.  The Council recognises the need for increased water capacity for Enniscorthy town and will prioritise working with Irish Water to deliver this necessary increased capacity.  
  18. The Council recognised the importance and potential to County Wexfordof the industrial and manufacturing area of the old Dublin road and will develop the area into a modern industrial centre. The Council will develop the amenities,services, visuals and access to the centre. The Council will particularly target FDI manufacturing companies to the area. 

There is a set of strategic objectives for the town set out in ET01 to ET08. The spatial planning strategy for the town will be set out in a new Enniscorthy Town and Environs Local Area Plan.

New Ross Town

The fourth largest town in the county, New Ross performs a variety of important functions including housing, employment, education, health care, retail, recreation, tourism and culture. The town has benefited from investment in recent years with the focus on securing the delivering of the N25 New Ross Bypass, developing the town’s tourism potential and improvement the public realm such as the Board walk and developing social and community facilities including The Library Park.  

Tourism is very much coming to the forefront as the town’s principle economic role. The development of the New Ross to Waterford Greenway is under way. The Council was recently granted €5.56 million in funding under Rural Development and Regeneration Fund to develop a New Ross Tourism Transformation Project. The project will see the development of three visitor attractions in an ambitious plan that combines renewal of prominent town centre sites with compelling tourism experiences focused around the town’s Norman history and the Dunbrody Famine Ship with the development of a new immersive visitor centre experience New Ross based on its former role as an emigration port. The works also include a major €1.2m public realm park redevelopment at High Hill.

The town is strategically located between Wexford Town and Waterford City and is designated in the RSES as a Hinterland Town of the Waterford MASP. The town has a strategic location on the route from the Eastern Economic Corridor to the Southern Region and the Atlantic Economic Corridor. The completion of the M25 Bypass, its water services capacities, New Ross Port and its significant tourism potential means that it is well positioned to accommodate additional growth.

Development Approach

In order to fulfil its role, the Council will apply the following development approach for New Ross Town:

  • Apply a moderate population growth rate with the aim of incrementally growing the population of New Ross to 10,000 persons over a few plan periods.
  • Focus on developing New Ross Town as a ‘Gateway’ given its location in the centre of the South-East and maximise the economic and social opportunities offered by the newly opened N25 New Ross By-Pass, the proximity to the Waterford MASP and the town’s links to the Eastern Economic Corridor, the South-East Greenway, Waterford Institute of Technology and Waterford Airport.
  • Focus on developing and maximising the tourism potential of the town, prioritising the development of the New Ross Tourism Transformational Project and securing the Fáilte Ireland Destination Town status for the town.
  • Focus on the regeneration of the town centre, utilising key brownfield and infill sites to deliver new housing, economic, commercial and tourism development. 
  • Support learning, education and training initiatives, economic regeneration initiatives and enterprise to address unemployment and deprivation legacies in the town.
  • Maximise the economic potential offered by New Ross Port and Belview Port, port-related development, manufacturing and transport and logistics sectors. 
  • Prepare a local transport plan that will inform zoning decisions, include the development of the town bus network improvements to cycling and walking infrastructure and rural transport services into the town and secure investment to deliver the plan. 
  • Support the delivery of the social and community infrastructure to support the additional population including education, health services, recreation and amenity open spaces, social and cultural requirements to keep pace with future planned population growth. 
  • Protect and enhance amenities, heritage, green infrastructure and biodiversity in all new development. 

There is a set of strategic objectives for New Ross Town are set out in NT01 to NT06. The spatial planning framework, which will incorporate this development approach, will be set out in a newly prepared New Ross Town and Environs Local Area Plan. 

3.6.3 Level 3 Service Settlements

There are 14 settlements included at this level: Bunclody Town, Castlebridge, Courtown and Riverchapel, Rosslare Harbour and Kilrane, Rosslare Strand, Ferns, Bridgetown, Campile, Clonroche, Coolgreany, Kilmore Quay, Kilmuckridge, Taghmon and Wellingtonbridge. 

Role and Function

While the size of these settlements varies, the settlements all share a common characteristic of being important service settlements for their local communities and their wider rural hinterlands. Some of the settlements are important contributors to economic activity in the county including Rosslare harbour and Kilrane (marine and port), Kilmore Quay (marine, fisheries and tourism), Rosslare Strand (tourism), Courtown and Riverchapel (tourism, marine and fisheries) and Clonroche (agri foods) and others offer economic potential including Bunclody Town and Ferns for tourism related development in particular. 

All of these settlements perform important functions including retail, commercial, education, residential, service and amenity functions. The location of these settlements, together with targeted growth and investment in services, will contribute to the balanced spatial development of the county. While some of these settlements have sufficient wastewater capacity, investment is required in Ferns, Bridgetown, Campile, Kilmore Quay and Wellingtonbridge to allow these settlements to further develop.  

Development Approach 

The development approach for the Service settlements is to:

  • Focus on moderate population growth in these settlements. The allocated growth is relative to their existing baseline populations, existing and possible potential for economic development and infrastructural capacities. Regard was also had to the rate and pace of past development and the need to deliver social and community facilities to keep paces with recent development e.g. Courtown Harbour and Riverchapel and Bridgetown.
  • Apply the sequential approach to the development of land, requiring residential development to take place within the existing footprint of the settlement. The leap frogging of infill/brownfield lands to undeveloped or greenfield lands will not be considered. 
  • Promote economic and enterprise development appropriate in scale to the settlements, such as expanding the potential of the marine economy and tourism in Kilmore Quay, the port and port-related development in Rosslare Harbour and developing the tourism potential of  Rosslare Strand, Bunclody Town and Ferns, 
  • Support learning, education and training initiatives, economic regeneration initiatives and enterprise to address unemployment and deprivation legacies which are evident is some of these settlements, e.g. Clonroche, Taghmon, Bunclody and, Bridgetown.
  • Focus on maximising opportunities presented to settlements located on, or in close proximity to planned greenway routes. 
  • Focus on the regeneration and renewal of these settlements. 
  • Ensure that new development contributes to the creation of attractive, liveable, well-designed, high quality settlements and the local communities enjoy a high quality of life and well-being.  
  • Support community organisations who are working to develop community facilities and promote and facilitate initiatives in the public realm.
  • Protect and enhance amenities, heritage, green infrastructure and biodiversity in these settlements. 

Bunclody Town and Rosslare Harbour and Kilrane have populations >1,500. Specific objectives and land use zoning for these settlements are included in Volume 3.  

Castlebridge and Rosslare Strand also have population >1,500. Specific objectives for both settlements are included in Volume 3 for these settlements. 

The lifetime of the Courtown and Riverchapel Local Area Plan has been extended by five years to 2026 and provides the spatial planning framework for this settlement. 

3.6.4 Level 4 Large Villages

There are 24 settlements included at this level: Adamstown, Ballaghkeen, Ballycanew, Ballycullane, Ballindaggin, Ballyhogue, Ballymurn, Ballywilliam, Barntown, Blackwater, Bree, Camolin, Carrig-on- Bannow, Clongeen, Craanford, Duncannon, Fethard, Killinerin, Murntown, Oilgate, Oulart, Piercestown, Ramsgrange and Tagoat.

Role and Function 

While these settlements vary in size and scale to each other, they share the common characteristics of providing important local level services. These villages have identifiable settlement structures and established populations and have the potential to support additional growth. The wastewater services in most of these villages require investment and it is considered that their inclusion at this in the hierarchy will provide a plan-led approach to securing this investment.  

Development Approach 

These are large villages that have a moderate level of existing infrastructural services, both physical and social, and are capable of accommodating additional population growth.

The spatial planning approach for these villages is to concentrate new residential growth within the exiting footprint of the village. The Council will apply the sequential approach to the development of land, focusing on the development of lands within and closest to the village centre first. ‘Leap-frogging’ of undeveloped lands andgreenfield lands  will not be considered. 
The density of developments in these settlements will be considered on a case-by-case basis having regard to the character of the settlement and its ability to absorb new development. This is discussed further in Section 4.7.2.1 in Chapter 4 Sustainable Housing. 

In order to safeguard their continued existence into the future, it is important that growth is encouraged and facilitated in a sustainable manner. These settlements should aim to target local investment in generally small scale non intensive industry that is based on local rural resources. 

Retail outlets should provide for the convenience needs of the local population. Social / recreational facilities should provide for the day to day needs of the local population.

In these settlements it is essential that growth is supported while also strictly controlled so that development is undertaken in a manner that is respectful to the character of these villages and the environmental sensitivities of these rural areas and the sensitivities of coastal settlements.  

New developments should contribute to the protection and enhancement of amenities, heritage, green infrastructure and biodiversity and recreation and open spaces. 

3.6.5 Level 5 Small Villages 

The county’s small villages play an important role in providing local retailing, services, social and recreational facilities to their respective communities and to the wider rural hinterlands. These villages also offer opportunities to attract new people seeking to live in a rural environment and provide an alternative to urban generated rural housing. This, in turn, will lead to opportunities for the provision of additional services. 

The smaller village level is divided into two categories: Category 1 and Category 2. The purpose of this sub-division is to ensure the development approach is appropriate to the character and scale of each type of village. 

Level 5 Small Village Category 1

There are 15 settlements in this category: Arthurstown, Caim, Davidstown, Duncormick, Glenbrien, Glynn, Kilmore, Kilmyshall, Kiltealy, Lady's Island, Marshalstown, Monagear, Newbawn, Rathnure and Screen.

Role and Function

These villages have identifiable settlement structures, established populations and have potential to support a small quantum of additional growth, while protecting the character of the settlement. The wastewater services in most of these villages require investment and it is considered that their inclusion at this level in the hierarchy will provide a plan-led approach to securing this investment.  

Development Approach

The development approach for these villages is to facilitate incremental growth in a sustainable manner. These villages will be consolidated by concentrating new growth in the village centre. The planning authority will apply the sequential approach to the development of land, focusing on the development of lands within the existing footprint and closest to the village centre first. ‘Leap-frogging’ of undeveloped lands will not be considered.

The scale and density of future residential development in these settlements will be strictly controlled. New residential development will only be considered where it is appropriate in scale to the size and character of the village. Future development in these villages should ideally be based on the development of a number of well-integrated sites within and around the village centre. This is discussed further in Section 4.7.2.1 in Chapter 4 Sustainable Housing. 

New developments should contribute to the protection and enhancement of amenities, heritage, green infrastructure and biodiversity and recreation and open spaces. 

Level 5 Small Villages Category 2 

There are 18 settlements in this category: Ballinaboola, Ballygarrett, Ballyhack, Ballymitty, Ballymoney, Boolavogue, Castledockrell, Cleriestown, Crossabeg, Curracloe, Duncormick, Foulkesmills, Gusserane, Holyfort, Monamolin, Monaseed, Rathangan and Tomhaggard.

Role and Function

These villages are similar in character to Category 1 villages, with the exception that they are generally smaller in scale, with more limited infrastructure and as such can accommodate lesser levels of growth than Category 1 villages.  In all other respects they perform a similar role and function as Category 1 villages acting as a place where the local rural community gathers and support the identity of the local community. Having regard to their status on a lower tier of the settlement hierarchy, it is particularly important to safeguard their continued existence into the future, and to ensure that growth is encouraged and facilitated in a sustainable manner.

Development Approach

The development approach for Category 2 villages is to ensure they maintain their existing population levels and services. Future growth will be incremental, small in scale and appropriate to the size, scale and character of the village. This is discussed further in Section 4.7.2.1 in Chapter 4 Sustainable Housing. 

These villages will be consolidated by concentrating new growth within the existing footprint of the village.  The planning authority will apply the sequential approach to the development of land, focusing on the development of lands within the existing footprint and closest to the village centre first. ‘Leap-frogging’ of undeveloped lands will not be considered. New developments should contribute to the protection and enhancement of amenities, heritage, green infrastructure and biodiversity and recreation and open spaces.   

3.6.6 Rural Nodes

There are 34 rural nodes: Ballycarney, Ballycogley, Ballyduff, Ballyedmond, Ballyellis, Ballyfad, Ballyoughter, Ballyroebuck, Baldwinstown, Cahore, Cassagh, Castletown, Cleariestown, Clologue, Clohamon, Cullenstown, Cushinstown, Donard, Galbally, Horeswood, Killann, Killenagh, Killurin, Poulpeasty, Raheen, Rathgarogue, Saltmills, Tara Hill, Tellarought, Tempeshambo, The Harrow, The Rock, Tombrack and Watchhouse Village.

Role and Function

These are ‘unstructured’ settlements best described as rural areas where a collection of one-off rural dwellings and/or local community or social services, such as a church, school, public house or a shop are clustered around a focal point, such as a crossroads. These settlements will be considered suitable for very limited new rural development, with the main purpose of the designation being to direct rural generated housing into these rural settlements rather than the open countryside.

Development Approach

The level of development in these rural settlements will be strictly controlled to ensure that the development is in keeping with the character of the settlement and the settlement has the infrastructural capacity to accommodate the additional development. 

Appropriately designed residential cluster type developments will be considered at these locations subject to complying with all planning, traffic safety and environmental criteria. A cluster development is defined as small residential development comprising of between two and five dwelling houses served by a communal vehicular entrance point and access road from the public road. Local need or the requirement to enter an occupancy agreement will not apply to the occupiers of single dwellings or cluster developments within the boundary of these rural nodes.

In general, the guiding principle is that no more than 5-10 houses will be permitted in a rural node during the period of this Plan. An exception to this may be considered where it is demonstrated that an additional dwelling(s) can be accommodated without detracting from the rural character of the node. 

3.6.7 Open Countryside 

The open countryside is at the lowest level of the Settlement Hierarchy and comprises those parts of the county outside of settlements in Level 1 to 6. One off rural housing in the open countryside will be considered where a social or functional economic need is demonstrated in accordance with Section 4.9  Chapter 4 Sustainable Housing.

3.7 Allocation of Population to the Settlement Hierarchy

The Core Strategy must be compliant with any relevant national and regional population targets. 

3.7.1 NPF and RSES Population Targets

The NPF Implementation Roadmap published in July 2018 outlines that given the differences between what many city and county development plans are currently making provision for and likely outcomes on the ground, there is a requirement for a transitional set of population projections to inform these plans for the periods to 2026 and 2031 in particular. These projections provide for a transitional approach to delivering better alignment between the plans at the different levels 2.  The transitional population projections for the Southern Region allocate the following population to County Wexford:

  • By 2026: a population of between 163,000 and 166,000
  • By 2031: a population of between 169,000 to 172,500. 

3.7.2 Achieving NPF Brownfield/Infill Targets

The introduction of significant infill/brownfield targets for residential development within existing settlement ‘footprints’ in the NPF must be factored in to reflect the move away from an excessive reliance on greenfield development to meet our development needs and encourage more city, town and village centre renewal. This means that the extent of zonings on peripheral greenfield development sites will need to be critically evaluated with regard to their compatibility with the renewal and regeneration targets set out in the NPF. This requires projected population growth to be planned in accordance with NPF national policy. 

Objectives NPO 3a, b and c, target infill and brownfield development within the existing built footprint of urban settlements. The NPF defines ‘footprint’ as the existing built-up footprint of all sizes of urban settlement, as defined by the CSO in line with the UN criteria i.e. having a minimum of 50 occupied dwellings, with a maximum distance between any dwelling and the building closest to it of 100 meters, and where there is evidence of an urban centre (shop, school etc.). Individual or scheme homes delivered outside of the CSO defined urban settlement boundary are classed as Greenfield.

The Core Strategy has to balance the requirement for different types of housing provision by location, to include the zoning of land where applicable, from: 

  1. Cities and their suburbs 
  2. Large towns 
  3. Small towns
  4. Settlements of 1,500 people or fewer
  5. The countryside generally.

The NPF states that where a local authority includes all of these five categories of housing location, at least three of these settlement types (i.e. i, ii and iii) must also include specific consideration of infill/ brownfield and greenfield capacity. The transitional level of growth to 2027 will provide sufficient scope to enable City and County Development Plans to be reviewed, land zonings to be prioritised and Local Area Plans and planning permissions to be worked through, while also allowing for agility and ambition, as well as monitoring and review, as we move towards full implementation of the NPF and NDP.

As this County Development Plan does not include zoning for the towns (other than Rosslare Harbour and Kilrane and Bunclody) it is not possible to identify at this stage which sites will be classified as infill and which will be classified as greenfield. It is likely that a significant portion of the allocated population will be capable of being accommodated on lands which would fall within definitions of infill or brownfield.

Similarly as the zoning for the towns are not included in the CDP it is not possible to tailor densities to particular sites (such as central sites or those on public transport corridors). Thus while the allocated population is set by the County Development Plan, the quantum of zoned land cannot be set until each of the specific towns are examined in their LAPS to determine their ability to achieve infill brownfield development, compact growth and higher densities . As such an assumed density of 25 units/hectare has been given to Wexford Town and Gorey Town, 25 units/hectare to Enniscorthy Town and New Ross Town and 25 units/hectare to the zoned Level 3 Settlements.  The density in the remaining Level 3 settlements will be determined by reference to the settlement size and the guiding densities set out in Chapter 6 of the Guidelines for Planning Authorities on Sustainable Residential Guidelines in Urban Areas (DELG, 2009).

3.7.3 Core Strategy Population Allocations

The allocation of population to the Settlement Hierarchy is shown in Table No. 3.2. These allocations are framed by the objectives of the NPF, the RSES and the vision for the county and informed by an analysis of the county which included:

  • Demographic profile of settlements and population projections. The projections were prepared to ensure that the population being allocated to any settlement was reasonable having regard to its existing demographic structure;
  • The location of the settlement and its ability to assist in achieving the aims of the Core Strategy;
  • The existing and potential for economic and enterprise development, 
  • Existing social infrastructure such as primary school or post primary school and existing services such as supermarket, pharmacy, post office,  hardware store, agricultural merchants, public house, hairdressers, and. 
  • Infrastructural and environmental capacities.

The population projections commissioned by the Council indicated that the county would have significantly higher growth than that contained in the NPF Roadmap. For this reason the upper number in the range provided were utilised to allocate the population.

NPO 9 outlines that settlements not identified in NPO 2a or 2b may be identified for significant rates of population growth (that is 30% or more above 2016 population levels) at regional or local planning stages subject to:

  • agreement with the regional assembly/local authority as appropriate;
  • balance with strategies for other urban and rural areas which means that the totality of planned population growth has to be in line with the overall growth target, and
  • a co-ordinated strategy that ensure alignment with investment in infrastructure and the provision of employment, together with the supporting amenities and services. 

In this regard and in order to achieve Centres of Scale, the Core Strategy allocates 40% and  35% growth to 2040 to Wexford Town and Gorey Town respectively. In the four main towns growth was front loaded so that 60% of the growth allocated to 2040 would take place in between 2016-2026 and the remainder would take place between 2026-2040.  

Table 3 -3 Allocation of Population to the Settlement Hierarchy

Settlement Hierarchy

Settlement

2016

2021

2027

2031

2040

Level 1 Key Towns

Wexford Town

20,188

22,611

25,264

26,187

28,263

Gorey

9,822

10,853

11,983

12,376

13,259

Level 2 Large Towns

Enniscorthy Town

11,381

12,405

13,527

13,917

14,795

New Ross Town 3

7,780

8,480

9,247

9,514

10,114

Level 3 Service Settlements

Bunclody Town 4

1,430

1,519

1,627

1,698

1,859

Castlebridge

1,840

1,955

2,093

2,185

2,392

Courtown and Riverchapel

3,591

3,741

3,920

4,040

4,309

Ferns

1,415

1,503

1,610

1,680

1,840

Rosslare Harbour and Kilrane

1,847

2,001

2,186

2,309

2,586

Rosslare Strand

1,620

1,721

1,843

1,924

2,106

Bridgetown (462) 5, Campile (448), Clonroche (326), Coolgreany (376), Kilmore Quay (372), Kilmuckridge (722), Taghmon (585), Wellingtonbridge (137) 6.

3428

3,628

3,868

4,028

4,389

Level 4 Large Villages7

Adamstown (293), Ballaghkeen (515), Ballycanew (516), Ballycullane (318), Ballindaggin, Ballyhogue (269), Ballymurn (524), Ballywilliam, Barntown (459), Blackwater (339), Bree(193), Camolin (415), Carrig on Bannow (258), Craanford, Clongeen (234), Duncannon (305), Fethard (311), Killinerin (244), Murntown (365), Oilgate (358), Oulart (274), Piercestown (535), Ramsgrange (126), Tagoat (439).

7,290

7,700

8,192

8,520

9,258

Level 1-47

 

71,632

78,118

85,359

 

88,378

95,170

Level 5, 6 and Open Countryside7

 

78,090

79,742

81,941

 

84,122

90997

NPF Roadmap County Total

 

149,722

157,860

167,300

172,500

186,167

3.8 Housing Requirements 

3.8.1 Existing Demand

The Planning and Development Act, 2000 (as amended) requires a development plan to include a Housing Strategy. The purpose of a Housing Strategy is to ensure that the proper planning and sustainable development of the area provides for the housing of the existing and future populations of the county. The Housing Strategy is contained in Volume 9, is consistent with the NPF and the RSES and incorporates the national and regional transitional population targets. 

It set outs existing housing demand and estimates the likely future housing demand, the location of this demand and the type and tenure of required house types. This has been factored into the Core Strategy in terms of the population allocations, housing land and stock requirements and the Settlement Strategy. 

3.8.2 Existing Housing Stock

According to Census 2016 there were 68,206 housing units in the county. 9.7% (6,616) of these were used as holiday homes, 8.7% (5,933) were vacant and 2.1% (1,432) were temporarily absent.  While potentially some of the vacant houses could meet both existing and future demand for housing, it is hard to quantify the amount of the housing requirements for the purposes of the Core Strategy.

3.8.3 Future Housing Stock Requirements 

Accordingly, it is assumed that 100% will be required . It is considered appropriate to assume this, particularly given the current demand for housing in the county (as detailed in the Housing Strategy). 
The county population target is 167,300 by 2027 which will require the delivery of additional housing units across the settlements in the hierarchy. 

3.8.4 Residential Zoned Land Housing Land Requirements 

Table No. 3-4  sets out the amount of residential zoned land and the number of household units required for the target population in specified settlements. The future land and residential unit requirements were assessed against the existing position and the shortfall or excess in the residential zoned land was identified accordingly. 

As outlined above the zoned land requirement for each level in the settlement hierarchy was determined based on an allocated average density for that settlement, e.g. Level 1 Key Towns 25 units/ha, Level 2 Large Towns 25 units/ha and 25 units/ha to the zoned Level 3 settlements. There will be no zoning in Levels 4, 5 and 6 on the Settlement Hierarchy.

The existing residential zoned land bank will be reviewed during the preparation of new local area plans and aligned as necessary with the population allocations and housing land requirements set out in the County Core Strategy. Furthermore, while these hectare calculations have been included in the Plan, it is considered that they should be reviewed for each local area plan with a view to achieving a correct balance of densities within each town or village. 

The tiered approach to zoning as set out in the NPF will also be applied to the zoning in the new local area plans. Table No 3.5 Core Strategy Population Allocation and Housing Land 2016-2027

Table No 3.4 Core Strategy Population Allocations and Housing Land 2016-2027

Settlement Level

Settlement

Core Strategy Population

Allocation

Households/

Housing Units 8

Average Density 9

Unit/HA

Zoned Land Required

Existing Zoning

(Ha)

Shortfall/

Excess

(Ha)

County Wexford

       

 

   

Key Town

Wexford

5,076

2410

25

96

406

+310

Gorey

2,161

998

25

40

99

+59

Large Town

Enniscorthy

2,146

972

25        

39

321

+282

New Ross

1,467

509

25

20

39

+19

Service Settlements

Bunclody Town10

197

96

25

4

0

-4

Castlebridge

253

104

-

-11

-

-

Courtown and Riverchapel

329

145

25

5.8

1.812

4

Ferns

195

66

-

-

-

-

Rosslare Harbour and Kilrane

339

85

25

3.4

0

3.4

Rosslare Strand

223

148

-

-

 

-

 

Bridgetown, Campile, Clonroche, Coolgreany, Kilmore Quay, Kilmuckridge, Taghmon, Wellingtonbridge

-

-

-

-

-

-

Level 4

Adamstown, Ballaghkeen, Ballycanew, Ballycullane, Ballyhogue, Ballymurn, Barntown, Blackwater, Bree, Camolin, Carrig on Bannow, Clongeen, Duncannon, Fethard, Killinerin, Murntown, Oilgate, Oulart, Piercestown, Ramsgrange, Tagoat.

-

-

-

-

-

-

Level 5, 6 and Open Countryside

 

3, 911

-

-

-

-

-

3.9 Housing in Level 7 Open Countryside

 As County Wexford is traditionally a rural county, rural housing forms an important component of our settlement pattern. The NPF acknowledges that there is a continuing need for housing provision for people to live and work in the countryside. However, care planning is required to manage demand in our most accessible countryside around cities and towns, focusing on the elements required to support the sustainable growth of rural economies and rural communities. 

Many parts of the county have and continue to experience significant pressure for rural housing. The reasons for this pressure include proximity to Dublin, affordability, attractiveness of the countryside, quality of life and pressure for second homes in the county’s scenic coastal areas. This pressure must be controlled in the interests of the proper planning of the county and in the interests of sustainable development.  

The Sustainable Rural Housing-Guidelines for Planning Authorities (DEHLG, 2005) provide the spatial planning policy framework to manage one-off rural housing. The policy approach is focused on facilitating people who have a definable social or economic need to reside in a particular rural area and a presumption against urban generated rural housing. The Guidelines identify three rural area types and planning authorities are required to examine, analyse and categorise rural area types at the local level. 

Rural areas types in the county were examined during the preparation of the Plan. This review included an analysis of the density of one off housing in all rural areas, planning permissions granted during the last Plan period and population change during the last Census period.  The analysis concluded:

  • There is continuing pressure for rural housing across most parts of the county.
  • The pressure is most significant within commuting distance of the mains towns in the county, along and in proximity to the main transport routes, in the north of the county and all along the east coast and south coast. 
  • There is no area in the county experiencing ‘substantial and persistent population decline’. However, there are rural areas in the west/northwest of the county where the population density is lower and there is less pressure in terms of planning applications.  
  • There are areas within the county which require a high level of protection due to special amenity or natural heritage reasons. 
  • There is need to restrict development on national roads and regional roads in the interests of traffic safety and protecting the carrying capacity and operation of these important transport routes. 

Having considered the analysis, recent development patterns, improvements in terms of accessibility and the attractiveness of living in the countryside and the knowledge that pressures for rural housing will continue during this plan period, the rural housing strategy and objectives have been framed to ensure that this pressure is managed in accordance with the Sustainable Rural Housing Guidelines for Planning Authorities, the NPF and the (see Chapter 4 Sustainable Housing for further detail). 

3.10 Retail

The Plan includes a Retail Strategy prepared in accordance with the Retail Planning Guidelines for Planning Authorities (2012). The Guidelines require retail development to follow the Settlement Hierarchy set by the NPF/RSES and ensure that retail development is appropriate to the scale and function of the settlement in the Core Strategy. 

The Strategy is aligned to the Corey Strategy and the Settlement Hierarchy. It focuses on maintaining and further developing the Key Towns and Large Towns as the main retail centres in the county. The development of retail services in the Service Settlements, Large Villages, Small Villages and Rural Nodes will be focused on providing support services for their respective populations and rural hinterlands.

Table 3.5 County Wexford Retail Settlement Hierarchy

Retail Planning Guidelines Settlement Type

Wexford Core Strategy Hierarchy

Retail Settlements

Appropriate Scale and Type of Retail

Level 1: Regional Town

Key Town

Wexford Town

Major Convenience and Comparison

Level 2: Large Sub-Regional Towns

Key Town

Gorey Town

Large to Medium scale convenience and medium scale comparison

Level 2: Large Sub-Regional Towns

Large Town

Enniscorthy Town / New Ross Town

Large to Medium scale convenience and medium scale comparison

Level 3: Small Service Towns

Service Settlements

Bridgetown, Bunclody, Campile, Castlebridge, Clonroche, Coolgreany, Courtown and Riverchapel, Ferns, Kilmuckridge, Kilmore Quay, Rosslare Harbour and Kilrane, Rosslare Strand, Taghmon and Wellingtonbridge

Medium scale convenience along with small to medium scale comparison including tourism related comparison

Level 4: Local Shopping or Neighbourhood Centres

Various Villages and Rural Settlements

 

Predominantly lower order convenience, but not excluding tourism related comparison

Core Strategy and Settlement Strategy Objectives

It is the objective of the Council:

Objective CS01

To implement the Core Strategy Guiding Principles and Development Approach and to ensure that required infrastructure and services are provided by infrastructure providers, either in advance or in tandem with development, to achieve this implementation.

Objective CS02

To ensure that new residential development in all settlements complies with the population and housing allocation targets and the principles set out in the Core Strategy and Settlement Development Strategy, in so far as practicable.
 

Objective CS03

To ensure that sufficient zoned lands are available to satisfy the planned population and housing growth in those settlements over the lifetime of the Plan.

Objective CS04

To achieve more compact growth by promoting the development of infill and brownfield/ regeneration sites and the redevelopment of underutilised land within the existing built up footprint of existing settlements in preference to greenfield lands and to undertake during the lifetime of this plan an audit of the brownfield sites in the four main towns.

Objective CS05 

To ensure that at least 30% of all new homes that are targeted in settlements are delivered within the existing built-up footprint of the settlement.

Objective CS06

To promote and facilitate the economic development of the Eastern Economic Corridor as an inter-urban regional economic driver, in particular, in Gorey Town, Enniscorthy Town, Wexford Town and Rosslare Harbour and Kilrane and the Europort.

Objective CS08

To prepare Local Transport Plans for the Key Towns and Large Towns which focus on the development of town bus networks, rail services, the development of inter-model transport hubs, improvements to cycling and walking infrastructure and rural transport services into towns and seek investments for the sustainable transport measures set out in these plans.

Objective CS09

To adopt a presumption in favour of development that can generate more jobs and activities within existing towns and villages in order to reduce the distances that people have to commute from home to work and subject to development complying with appropriate planning standards and achieving targeted growth.

Objective CS10

To leverage funding from all available sources including the Urban and Rural Development and Regeneration Funds to help secure the delivery of key projects that will contribute to securing the objectives of the Core Strategy and Settlement Strategy.

Objective CS11

To support the concept of rural settlement networks and support the sustainable development of infrastructure to assist collaborative projects and sharing of assets and strengths to drive sustainable population and enterprise growth in sub-regional areas.

Objective CS12

To recognise the shared critical mass of population, strategic assets and economic potential of inter-urban networks working in collaborative partnerships as regionally significant drivers of growth and support investment in infrastructure and initiatives to sustainable deliver improved multi-modal transport connectivity and high speed, high quality digital connectivity between them.

Objective CS13

To strengthen the social and economic structure of rural towns and villages by supporting the reuse of existing buildings and the regeneration of underutilised buildings and lands.

Objective CS14

To prepare new local area plans for Wexford Town, Enniscorthy Town and New Ross Town and to ensure all future local area plans are prepared in accordance with the relevant aspects of the Development Plan Guidelines for Planning Authorities (2007), the Local Area Plan Guidelines for the Planning Authorities (2012) and all other relevant Section 28 Guidelines or any updated version of these guidelines.

Objective CS15

To strengthen the viability of our rural towns and villages and to support the retention of essential rural services such as post offices, shops and medical facilities.

Objective CS16

To seek investment and initiatives that deliver smart technologies, revitalisation of mixed-use town and village centre streets and pilot initiatives for good practice in renewal and re-use of buildings.

Objective CS17

To protect and promote the quality, character and distinctiveness of the county’s rural towns, villages and open countryside while supporting the proportionate growth and appropriately designed development that contributes to their revitalisation and renewal and the development of sustainable communities.

Objective CS18 

To ensure the Key Towns of Wexford Town and Gorey Town continue to be drivers of economic growth and prosperity for region, the county and their Municipal Districts by maximising their strategic location advantages to attract, employment and population growth, developing their services and functions and protecting and enhancing their town centres, public realm and heritage and environmental quality making the towns high quality sustainable places to work, live and visit.

Objective CS19 

To ensure the Large Towns of Enniscorthy and New Ross are drivers of growth and prosperity for the county and their respective Municipal Districts by maximising their potential for attracting economic development, employment and population growth, developing their service and retail functions while protecting and enhancing their distinctive town centres whilst protecting their local heritage and environmental quality and making the towns high quality sustainable places to live, work and visit.

Objective CS20

To ensure growth and development in the Service Settlements, Large Villages and Small villages across the county is proportionate to the scale, size and character of the settlement and well designed so as to contribute to the regeneration of these settlements including interventions in the public realm, the provision of amenities, the acquisition of sites and the provision of services and ensure good quality of life and well-being for the local communities.

Objective CS21

To work with public infrastructure providers such as Irish Water and local communities to provide serviced sites with appropriate infrastructure to attract people to build their own homes and live in the designated Large Villages and Small Villages in the county subject to compliance with normal planning and environmental criteria and the proper planning and sustainable development of the county.

Objective CS22

To ensure that Rural Nodes throughout the county maintain their existing character and provide only very small scale growth appropriate to their character.

Objective CS23 

To ensure that the open countryside continues to be a living and lived in landscaped focusing on the requirements of rural economies and rural communities while at the same protecting the open countryside from inappropriate development, urban generated housing and protecting its landscape and environmental quality.

Wexford Town Strategic Objectives

Objective WT01

To strengthen the role of Wexford Town as a self-sustaining regional economic driver and located on the Eastern Economic Corridor by leveraging this strategic location and accessibility to Rosslare Europort and building upon its inherent strengths including digital connectivity, skills, innovation and enterprise, tourism, culture and retail services.

Objective WT02

To support the development of the Wexford Campus as part of the Multi-Campus Technological University of the South East, and facilitate all associated services including student accommodation and recreational facilities.

Objective WT03

To promote and support the development of the Trinity Wharf lands as a Strategic Employment Location.

Objective WT04

To develop industrial, commercial, infrastructure and residential development in Wexford Town to support the port function at Rosslare Europort

Objective WT05

To support development of additional capacity at Rosslare Europort and the provision of rail freight services and facilities to support sustainable increases in port operations.

Objective WT06

To support the development of tourism projects in the town including those associated with the town’s new Maritime brand such as the planned marina at Trinity Wharf, and the proposed Wexford to Rosslare Greenway subject to compliance with the Habitats Directive and the proper planning and sustainable development of the town.

Objective WT07

To support the delivery of the infrastructural requirements which would benefit the key town role including improved road infrastructure such the M11/M25 Oilgate to Rosslare Harbour scheme and upgrading of the N30 and N80, improved digital connectivity, upgrading and development of water supply and additional investment in wastewater infrastructure to support the economic development and anticipated growth of the town.

Objective WT08

To support the delivery of infrastructural requirements to allow Wexford Town keep pace with the planned population and economic growth. These requirements include education and the prioritisation of additional primary and post primary school places in order to address existing and future demand and the provision of additional social, cultural and amenity facilities including the new Min Ryan Park and the redevelopment of Wexford Arts Centre.

Objective WT09

To improve the public realm and attractiveness of the town through the regeneration and revitalisation of key locations such as the Trinity Wharf lands, the Crescent Quay Public Realm Enhancement project and public realm works on Monck Street.

Objective GT01

To strengthen the role of Gorey Town as an economic driver leveraging its strategic location and accessibility to Rosslare Europort and the Eastern Economic Corridor (port, rail and road), build upon its inherent strengths including digital connectivity, skills, innovation and enterprise, tourism, culture and retail services.

Objective GT02

To facilitate strategic employment development in the town allow it become more self-sufficient in terms of employment including development of opportunity sites and property solutions.

Objective GT03

To seek an economic funding package for the further development, in partnership with private investors, of the M11 Business Park as a Strategic Employment Location for the town.

Objective GT04

To ensure the Local Transport Plan for the town provides the framework to seek investment to develop a public transport inter modal hub in the town, develop an orbital route and new road bridges over at Ballytegan and Ramstown/Knockmullen) and improved pedestrian and cycling infrastructure.

Objective GT05

To improve the public realm and attractiveness of the town centre as a place to live, work and visit. This will include key urban regeneration projects/environmental improvement schemes such as the redevelopment of the Market House for cultural uses and the planned public realm improvements to Esmonde Street.

Objective GT06

To support the delivery of infrastructural requirements to allow Gorey keep pace with the planned population growth. These requirements include education and the prioritisation of additional post primary school places in order to address existing and future demand and the provision of additional social, cultural and amenity facilities including the redevelopment of Gorey Town and District Park.

Objective GT07

To support key infrastructure projects for the town including the delivery of natural gas and improvements to the N11 Gorey to Enniscorthy such as the improvements to the N30 and the N11/N25 Oilgate to Rosslare scheme.

Enniscorthy Town Strategic Objectives

Objective ET01

To strengthen the role of Enniscorthy Town as a Large town with a large economic hinterland and leveraging its strategic location and accessibility to Rosslare Europort and the Eastern Economic Corridor (port, rail and road) build on its inherent strengths including digital connectivity, innovation and enterprise, tourism, and culture, to facilitate economic and employment growth in the town, and in particular promote Enniscorthy Business and Technology Park and the NZEB Training Centre as key economic drivers for the town and to support the development and improvement of the business/industrial centre at Kilcannon and located on the R772 and Old Dublin Road into a modern Business park capable of attracting international companies as key economic driver for the County.

Objective ET02

To develop Enniscorthy Town and its surrounding area as Tourism Destination and facilitate new tourism related developments, both direct and indirect, that will facilitate and expand the tourism offering and potential of the town.

Objective ET03

To pursue Smart Town status for the town, and to maximise the opportunities offered by that status for all aspects of life in the town.

Objective ET04

To support the development of learning, education and training initiatives, economic regeneration and enterprise initiatives to address legacies of unemployment and deprivation in the town.

Objective ET05

To promote the development of a Blueway along the River Slaney in the town subject to compliance with the Habitats Directive and normal planning and environmental criteria.

Objective ET06

To improve the public realm and attractiveness of the town centre as a place to live, work and visit through key urban regeneration projects/environmental improvement schemes such the proposed Templeshannon Regeneration project, brownfield sites along the Quays and other town centre enhancement works

Objective ET07

To support the delivery of infrastructure requirements to allow Enniscorthy keep pace with the planned population growth including the delivery of natural gas, and improvements to road links such as the N30 and the N80 and the proposed N11/N25 Oilgate to Rosslare Scheme and improvements to digital connectivity to support the achievement of Smart Town status, upgrading and development of water supply and amenity facilities including in the development of a public space with playground facilities in St Senan’s parish of Enniscorthy town. Any such proposals will be subject to Appropriate Assessment in accordance with the requirements of the EU Habitats Directive to ensure the protection of all designated SACs and SPAs. 

Objective ET08

To support the delivery of infrastructural requirements to allow Enniscorthy to keep pace with the planned population growth. These requirements include provision of additional educational facilities including additional post-primary school places to address existing and future demand, social, cultural and amenity facilities.

New Ross Town Strategic Objectives

Objective NT01

To maximise the economic development potential of the town, optimising the potential offered by the N25 New Ross By-pass, the presence of New Ross Port and its proximity to the Waterford MASP and Wexford Town.

Objective NT02

To focus on tourism development as a key economic driver for the town and the county, prioritising the implementation of the New Ross Tourism Transformation Project, securing Fáilte Ireland designation as Tourism Destination Town and the development of the New Ross to Waterford Greenway.

Objective NT03

To facilitate the development of the proposed Business Hub on John Street.

Objective NT04

To focus on the development of brownfield and infill sites along the Quays and streets in the town centre for population, economic, enterprise, commercial and retail developments.

Objective NT05

To improve the public realm and attractiveness of the town centre as a place to live, work and visit through key urban regeneration projects/environmental improvement schemes such as the High Hill Street Park and the removal of the old oil tanks and the construction of a new public space in their place on the Quays.

Objective NT06

To support the development of learning, education and training initiatives, economic regeneration and enterprise initiatives to address legacies of unemployment and deprivation in the town.

Objective NT07

To work with Kilkenny County Council towards the preparation a joint Local Area Plan for the New Ross Town and Rosbercon areas. 

Objective NT08

To support key infrastructure projects for the town including the delivery of natural gas.
  • 1- In the event that a settlement has not been allocated a ‘level’ in the Settlement Hierarchy, the Planning Authority will determine the appropriate level, role, function and growth controls for that settlement and advise accordingly.
  • 2-  The transitional population projections plot a growth trajectory set approximately mid-way between what is currently being planned for in statutory Development Plans if projected forward to 2031, and the more likely evidence based and nationally coherent projected scenario to 2031 and 2040. These ‘adjusted’ transitional figures will apply to 2026 and will also inform the period to 2031. Transitional population projections, rounded to the nearest 500 persons, and expressed as a range with 20% variation, are included for each Region and County in Appendix 2 of the Roadmap.
  • 3 - Wexford portion only
  • 4-  Wexford portion estimated
  • 5-  Figures in brackets are CSO 2016
  • 6- Estimate – C.S.O. Figure not available
  • 7-  There is no CSO 2016 population figure available for Ballindaggin, Ballywilliam, Craanford and as such it was not possible to calculate a projection/allocation for these settlements. Therefore the population for these settlements is excluded from the aggregate allocation totals for Level 4 and are included under the aggregate population for Level 5, 6 and Rural Remainder.
  • 8- For the purposes of calculating households it was assumed that household size will remain the same in Wexford Town, Enniscorthy and New Ross (all already close to NPF projected rate for 2040 at 2.42, 2.56, 2.46 respectively) and that Gorey and the other settlements will track to NPF2.5 by 2040.
  • 9- Final density will be decided in the respective Local Area Plans. Population allocation will remain fixed but the density will be tailored in accordance with the density set out in the Sustainable Housing in Urban Areas - Guidelines for Planning Authorities and the requirements of the NPF in terms of compact growth and the requirement that 30% of all residential development will be in infill and brownfield sites. Housing units built between 2016 and the date of the respective LAP will also be removed when the LAPs are being completed.
  • 10- Wexford portion
  • 11- No zoning is proposed for these settlements.
  • 12-  The Core Strategy of the Courtown Local Area Plan allocated a population of 227 for the period of the plan. When calculating the required land it was reduced to reflect the level of vacancy in the settlement and extant permissions. The plan was examined in 2019 and a decision taken to defer the sending of notices under Section 19 of the Act. It is considered that, having regard to the level of vacancy in Courtown, the quantum land currently zoned is adequate to cater for this demand.

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Transport Infrastructure Ireland submission.
TII submission. 
EMRA submission
Please see attached submission.
Rezoning of lands at Glen Richards, Ardamine.
Please see attached submission.
Core Strategy Requirement s
Rosslare to Waterford Rail Line I note that on the core strategy map does not include the Rosslare to Waterford railline. This is contray to the Planning and Development Act 2000 as amended,...
Settlement Hierarchy - status of Killinick in relation to same.
Dear Sir/Madam, I trust you are keeping safe & well in these trying times.  I write in relation to what appears to be an oversight at this stage in the process of preparing the new...